November 27, 2015

What to Do When Kids Aren’t Allowed to Read Digital Books in School

Pat Scales, chair of the American Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee and SLJ columnist, regularly fields questions on banned library materials. But “this is the first I’ve encountered in which a book’s format has been censored,” she writes.

View TDS Archive
On October 14, 2015 Library Journal, School Library Journal, and thousands of library professionals from around the world gathered for the 6th annual Digital Shift virtual conference to focus on the challenges and opportunities presented by the digital transition’s impact on libraries, their communities, and partners. Now available on-demand, this year’s program provides actionable answers to some of the biggest questions our profession faces for and from libraries of all types – school, academic, and public and features thought-provoking keynotes from John Palfrey, author of BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google, and Denise Jacobs, tech leader, author, and creativity evangelist.
Kathy Ishizuka About Kathy Ishizuka

Kathy Ishizuka (, @kishizuka on Twitter) is Executive Editor of School Library Journal.


  1. I am appalled that e-format is being discriminated against. I do think a discussion with the classroom teacher, the reading teacher and if there isn’t any movement with the principal. I can understand the classroom or reading teacher insisting on a certain level book for assessment of comprehension and fluency (all titles are not available in e-format) but for independent reading this policy seems absurd.

Speak Your Mind


Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.