February 13, 2016

Bots, Block Chain, and Beacons Hot Topics at LITA Tech Trends Panel | ALA Midwinter 2016

Moderator Lisa Bunker, Social Media Librarian for Pima County Public Library (AZ) ; Jason Griffey, founder and principal of consulting and creation firm Evenly Distributed; Jim Hahn, orientation services and environments librarian and associate professor at the University of Illinois Undergraduate Library; Jamie Hollier, co-owner and co-CEO of technology consultancy Anneal; Alex Lent, director of the Millis Public Library (MA); Thomas Padilla, digital scholarship librarian at Michigan State University Libraries; and Ken Varnum, senior program manager for discovery, delivery, and learning analytics at the University of Michigan Library, during the Library Information Technology Association’s (LITA) Top Tech Trends panel at the American Library Association’s 2016 Midwinter conference in Boston.

Drexel Librarian, Students Help Design 10th Annual Knovel Academic Challenge

The Knovel Academic Challenge enables thousands of engineering students at universities around the world to hone their research skills while competing for prizes and recognition. This year, a group of four students from Drexel University, assisted by Jay Bhatt, the university’s liaison librarian for engineering, took their participation to another level, designing the engineering problem sets that were used in this fall’s 10th annual challenge.

JSTOR, DataLab Launch Sustainability Site, Collaborate on Tools for Interdisciplinary Researchers

JSTOR Labs, in partnership with Eigenfactor project co-founder Dr. Jevin West and the University of Washington’s DataLab, have launched JSTOR Sustainability, a new website powered by Eigenfactor Article Influence scores and a 1,500 term semantic index created by JSTOR. Currently in beta, the new website is the product of JSTOR and DataLab’s collaborative effort to help scholars in interdisciplinary fields understand and navigate literature outside of their core areas of expertise.

Professor, Library Map the Medieval World

Mappamundi is the online web portal for the Global Middle Ages Project (GMAP) based out of the University of Texas at Austin (UT). It links to a series of Digital Humanities projects by scholars from around the world about people, places, and objects from the period of roughly 500-1500 CE. Although many people think of this period solely as the European “Dark Ages,” the project directors are interested in portraying a much more global picture. Many of the projects focus on areas outside of Europe and are interested in cultural exchange between peoples.

Professor, Library Map the Medieval World

Mappamundi is the online web portal for the Global Middle Ages Project (GMAP) based out of the University of Texas at Austin (UT). It links to a series of Digital Humanities projects by scholars from around the world about people, places, and objects from the period of roughly 500-1500 CE. Although many people think of this period solely as the European “Dark Ages,” the project directors are interested in portraying a much more global picture. Many of the projects focus on areas outside of Europe and are interested in cultural exchange between peoples.

Manifold Scholarship Turns Scholarly Books into Iterative Digital Projects | Charleston Conference 2015

During the Charleston Conference session “New Platforms and Discovery Tools: Towards 21st Century University Presses and Libraries”, two Mellon Foundation-funded projects were introduced: UPScope Project, a university press-wide discovery engine based on natural language searches, being developed by the Association of American University Presses, and the Manifold Scholarship project, detailed below.

Always Watched | The Digital Shift 2015

At Library Journal and School Library Journal’s October 14 virtual conference, The Digital Shift: Libraries Connecting Communities, “Always Watched: How Being Surveilled Online Impacts Us All and What Librarians Can Do About It” , attendees were reminded that government and commercial surveillance is an issue of increasing importance for libraries and users alike, and librarians need to consider issues of privacy more than ever.

Whizz! Bang! Pow! Making an Impact with Digital Signage | The Digital Shift 2015

If you were put in charge of the digital signage at your library, would you know where to start? Laurel Eby, web wervices librarian at San José State University’s (SJSU) King Library, was tasked with implementing three digital signs. “In the beginning I had no idea what I was doing,” Eby said in her “Whizz! Bang! Pow! Making an Impact with Digital Signage” presentation for Library Journal and School Library Journal’s online conference The Digital Shift: Libraries Connecting Communities, held October 14. “What should I put on the signs? How big were they, anyway? And how long could I reasonably expect students to stand there staring at them, reading content on them?”

Pairing Context with Access in E-Collections | The Digital Shift 2015

One of the latest additions to the digital repository at Arizona State University (ASU) is a selection of issues of the Wassaja Newsletter, an important record of Native American culture and activism in the early 20th century. At Library Journal and School Library Journal’s virtual conference, The Digital Shift: Libraries Connecting Communities, ASU associate librarian Joyce Martin and digital curator and research data manager Jodi Reeves Flores discussed the project, emphasizing the role that partners in the Native American community had played in improving this resource by providing valuable context for the newly available content.

The Human Connection | The Digital Shift 2015

Libraries may be going digital, but librarians still bring—and need—that personal touch. On October 14, Library Journal and School Library Journal’s virtual conference, The Digital Shift, Libraries Connecting Communities, aptly demonstrated this in a wide range of offerings throughout the day-long event.