September 3, 2014

E. It’s Complicated. How Two Schools are Riding the Transition to Ebooks

Print

For this close-up report on going digital, SLJ talked to academic experts, librarians, teachers, and students at two Illinois high schools. Big questions: What are the best ebook providers? How many student iPads get damaged? Do students read more in ebook or print? And more.

High School Students Use Cell Phones in Class—but not for Schoolwork, Says Study

Smartphones

Just as many high school teachers are becoming comfortable with incorporating smartphones and other digital devices into classrooms to aid with learning, a new study finds that a majority of high school students are already using cell phones in class—to text, to send emails, and to browse social media sites.

INFOdocket: Top Resources for K–12

infodocket

Looking for new, timely online resources for your K–12 students? Gary Price, an industry analyst librarian and editor of LJ’s INFOdocket, has selected the following recent posts for school librarians. Topics range from current and past presidential debates to German Jewish history. Price is also co-founder and editor of FullTextReports.com.

Libraries, Ebooks, and Beyond: Tablets in the Classroom

tablets

Ereaders and iPads are becoming integral parts of the school library because they foster creativity and encourage flexibility in learning. But are students using this technology effectively? Panelists from SLJ’s session, “Tablets in the Classroom: New Strategies, New Solutions,” discussed how to ensure that students are relying on these devices to truly make the most of their educational experiences.

Is Amazon Whispercast Enough?: Doubts Remain on Kindle’s Adoption by Schools

Whisper

Amazon’s newest service, Whispercast, attempts to make Kindles more tempting to librarians by letting them control multiple Kindles from a single access account. However, many librarians have doubts, and there are remaining unanswered questions.

All a Twitter About Apps

What do users want to see in kids’ book apps? More offerings for young adult and middle grade readers and better functionality—like being able to control the narration speed or kill the music. These ideas and more were the talk of a recent Twitter “party” thrown by digital publisher Ruckus Media.