November 19, 2014

Ebooks Take Hold in Schools—Slowly

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The adoption and use of ebooks in U.S. school libraries has grown steadily over the past four years, slowed mainly by limited access to ereading devices and cost, says a new ebooks report by School Library Journal, sponsored by Follett.

Survey: Library Ebook Growth Slowing but Still Substantial

Library Journal’s fifth annual Ebook Usage in U.S. Public Libraries report

Ninety-five percent of public libraries currently offer ebooks to patrons, up from 72 percent in 2010, and 89 percent in both 2012 and 2013. However, money remains the biggest impediment for libraries looking to add ebooks or expand collections, according to Library Journal’s fifth annual Ebook Usage in U.S. Public Libraries report, sponsored by Freading. The growth in demand for ebooks has cooled during the past four years, although as the report notes, this “is only because [ebooks] have become less of a novelty and more mainstream.”

SLJ Reviews Gobstopper and Subtext: Apps that Enable Interactive Classroom Reading

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The ability for teachers and students to embed their own content into digital texts, write notes, and get feedback on student reading—classroom reading just got a lot more dynamic. SLJ columnist Jeff Hastings test driives Gobstopper and Subtext.

Is Amazon Whispercast Enough?: Doubts Remain on Kindle’s Adoption by Schools

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Amazon’s newest service, Whispercast, attempts to make Kindles more tempting to librarians by letting them control multiple Kindles from a single access account. However, many librarians have doubts, and there are remaining unanswered questions.