October 4, 2015

Roy Tennant

About Roy Tennant

Roy Tennant is a Senior Program Officer for OCLC Research. He is the owner of the Web4Lib and XML4Lib electronic discussions, and the creator and editor of Current Cites, a current awareness newsletter published every month since 1990. His books include "Technology in Libraries: Essays in Honor of Anne Grodzins Lipow" (2008), "Managing the Digital Library" (2004), "XML in Libraries" (2002), "Practical HTML: A Self-Paced Tutorial" (1996), and "Crossing the Internet Threshold: An Instructional Handbook" (1993). Roy wrote a monthly column on digital libraries for Library Journal for a decade and has written numerous articles in other professional journals. In 2003, he received the American Library Association's LITA/Library Hi Tech Award for Excellence in Communication for Continuing Education. Follow him on Twitter @rtennant.

Astonishing Public Service

Last night I dined at the bar of a run-of-the-mill chain restaurant. On the road for business this is my usual modus operandi, with the variant of dining in the hotel bar instead. You get the picture. So my bartender in this instance turns out to be flat out awesome. She’s there when I want her and not […]

IPFS: The Most Interesting Internet Technology You’ve Never Heard Of


Slinging across my Twitter feed came this: “HTTP is obsolete. It’s time for the distributed, permanent web.” Intrigued, I went to take a look. It wasn’t long before my jaw dropped open. What the post was describing was a nascent technology and protocol that was like a combination of the best parts of BitTorrent and […]

Where Your Favorite Programming Language Ranks


Every programmer knows that any time you want to start a religious war just ask everyone’s favorite programming language and why. This will almost certainly touch off an ever-more-heated exchange as to why one’s particular choice should be every thinking person’s obvious selection. It may even devolve so far as to include name calling. But hey, […]

The Oldest Internet Publication You’ve Never Heard Of


Twenty-five years ago I started a library current awareness service called Current Cites. The idea was to have a team of volunteers monitor library and information technology literature and cite only the best publications in a monthly publication (see the first page of the inaugural issue pictured). Here is the latest issue. TidBITS is, I […]

Wikipedia Comes to ALA


Jake Orlowitz of the Wikipedia Library Project reports that Wikipedia will be having quite a presence at ALA Annual in San Francisco this week. Here are some details: #WikiLovesALA editathon The Wikipedia Library invites you to the #WikiLovesALA editathon on June 26 from 1pm to 4pm at the Wikimedia Foundation Office, in celebration of the […]

What I’m Glad I Didn’t Know Upon Graduating

While writing my last post about what I wish I had known upon graduating (from library school), I decided that I wanted to write a companion piece about what I was glad I didn’t know. Perhaps the reason for this will soon become clear. So here we go: You know nothing. No, seriously, you don’t. […]

What I Wish I Had Known Upon Graduating


One of my daughters graduated from college last week (see pic). Call me a proud Dad, as she graduated with top honors (Summa cum laude) from Tulane University in New Orleans. This, while holding down two jobs in her last semester. So like many people who have college, high school, middle school, or whatever graduations in […]

The Thing About Bitcoin: It’s Not the Coin, It’s the Chain


I will admit to owning just over one bitcoin, largely as an experiment. It’s no more than I’m willing to lose outright, so you can say that I sleep soundly at night. But a while back I came across this piece at O’Reilly Radar and it changed my perspective on bitcoin entirely. The author argues (persuasively […]